KEEPING OUR STORIES ALIVE

What's in the Archives? Gay Bell

What’s in the Archives? Gay Bell

What’s in the Archives? Gay Bell

Earlier this year, Gay Bell donated a large number of posters, journals, photography, correspondence, and newspaper clippings about the Peterborough and Haliburton LGBTQ2+ events and activities.  This represents a large contribution to our collection of feminist lesbian content and gay labour movement histories, to which Gay Bell has been a long-term and significant contributor.

Gay Bell, is a prolific feminist lesbian and labour movement activist as a writer and contributor in the early days of the Body Politic, a founding member of LOOT – Lesbian Organization of Toronto –  and activist and contributor to queer positive initiatives within the Canadian Auto Workers Union, the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) and the Canadian Labour Congress.

LOOT Flyer, on file in archives, August 1979
LOOT Flyer, on file in archives

 

 

LOOT grew out of a meeting convened at CHAT offices on Church Street in 1976.  Between 30-60 women attended the meeting and agreed to create Canada’s first Lesbian Centre, which was established at 342 Jarvis Street. In 2008, Gay Bell started her contributions to the CLGA and donated issues of The Body Politic and The Other Woman, one of several publications that grew out of LOOT, as well as her labour-related reports, files and artifacts.

In the 2017 we received Gay Bell’s radio interviews with gay and lesbian prisoners (audio cassettes), a digital copy of an interview she gave about her life, and a copy of the video she directed: CUPE 4400 on Strike. In addition to the rich media content, we have a series of periodicals, CUPE material, activist material, plays, theatre scripts, posters, thesis, research material, union buttons and one fridge magnet (CUPE Positive Space). Gay Bell’ important contributions to the archives are available upon request for anyone who is interested in delving deeper into this significant collection.

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What’s in the Archives? Gay Bell

What’s in the Archives? Gay Bell

Earlier this year, Gay Bell donated a large number of posters, journals, photography, correspondence, and newspaper clippings about the Peterborough and Haliburton LGBTQ2+ events and activities.  This represents a large contribution to our collection of feminist lesbian content and gay labour movement histories, to which Gay Bell has been a long-term and significant contributor.

Gay Bell, is a prolific feminist lesbian and labour movement activist as a writer and contributor in the early days of the Body Politic, a founding member of LOOT – Lesbian Organization of Toronto –  and activist and contributor to queer positive initiatives within the Canadian Auto Workers Union, the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) and the Canadian Labour Congress.

LOOT Flyer, on file in archives, August 1979
LOOT Flyer, on file in archives

 

 

LOOT grew out of a meeting convened at CHAT offices on Church Street in 1976.  Between 30-60 women attended the meeting and agreed to create Canada’s first Lesbian Centre, which was established at 342 Jarvis Street. In 2008, Gay Bell started her contributions to the CLGA and donated issues of The Body Politic and The Other Woman, one of several publications that grew out of LOOT, as well as her labour-related reports, files and artifacts.

In the 2017 we received Gay Bell’s radio interviews with gay and lesbian prisoners (audio cassettes), a digital copy of an interview she gave about her life, and a copy of the video she directed: CUPE 4400 on Strike. In addition to the rich media content, we have a series of periodicals, CUPE material, activist material, plays, theatre scripts, posters, thesis, research material, union buttons and one fridge magnet (CUPE Positive Space). Gay Bell’ important contributions to the archives are available upon request for anyone who is interested in delving deeper into this significant collection.

Leave a reply

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CONTACT US


Telephone: 416-777-2755
Email: queeries@clga.ca

Street Address:
34 Isabella Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1N1

Mailing Address:
Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives
P.O. Box 699
663A Yonge Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1Z9

PUBLIC HOURS

6:30 pm - 9:00 pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Friday

NOTE TO RESEARCHERS:
Some of our materials are stored off site. Before visiting the archives, please send us an email at queeries@clga.ca listing in detail the topics and sources that you wish to consult and we will let you know when they will be available. We aim to respond to email inquiries within 4 business days.

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE:

As we continue our efforts to make the CLGA more accessible, we are now renovating the front of the house to add a ramp to the front entrance. The exterior construction started Monday, September 17, 2018 and will continue until late November. The first steps will be working to fence off the tree at the front of the house. Please note that there will not be any construction work done during public service hours. Should there be any disruptions affecting our access to the front door and/or work in the house during this process, we will post a notice as soon as possible. Thank you for your understanding and patience as we try to make the CLGA more accessible to all. If you have any questions/concerns, please contact the Executive Director, Raegan Swanson, at executivedirector@clga.ca

Update – Sep 27, 2018: The front door is currently not accessible due to construction. Please use the back door until further notice.


The Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives is located on the traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishnaabe and the Huron-Wendat. Today, Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

The CLGA strives to gather the stories of the unheard and silenced voices of the 2SLGBTQ+ first peoples of this land. We acknowledge that some stories have already been lost, and we aim to ensure that those that remain and those that are to come are preserved for the future.