KEEPING OUR STORIES ALIVE

Queer Progress: an archival workshop with activist-historian Tim McCaskell on the Toronto of post-decriminalization, 1969-1974

Queer Progress: an archival workshop with activist-historian Tim McCaskell on the Toronto of post-decriminalization, 1969-1974

Revisiting his own granular research that forms the backbone of the activist history Queer Progress: from Homophobia to Homonationalism, Toronto activist and education advocate Tim McCaskell will discuss queer politics in the period from the 1969 Omnibus to his first Gay Pride in 1974.

Heading west along Carlton St. Toronto Gay Pride March, August 1974.
Photo by Charles Dobie onthebookshelves.com
Police escort waiting for march to begin, Carlton St. Toronto Gay Pride March, August 1974.
Photo by Charles Dobie onthebookshelves.com

Participants will get an up- close look at the documents and mood of the period of early “gay liberation,” before the hegemony of Stonewall and the commercialism and police collaboration Topics discussed will include: how to look for community history in media and memory; the need for a broader social analysis to make sense of this history; queers and the police; and what the 1969 turning point did and did not accomplish for LGBTQ people in Toronto, and Canada at large.

The cover of Tim McCaskell’s book Queer Progress: From Homophobia to Homonationalism.

Tim McCaskell is a long-time Toronto writer, activist and educator. He was a collective member of The Body Politic, Canada’s first national magazine for Lesbian and Gay Liberation from 1974 to 1986, chair of the Public Action Committee of the Right to Privacy Committee which fought back against police raids on gay baths in Toronto in the early 1980s, and part of the Simon Nkodi Anti-Apartheid Committee: Lesbians and Gays Against Apartheid in the late 80s. He was a founding member of AIDS ACTION NOW!, an activist group which won access to experimental treatments and funding for medications in the 1990s and Queers Against Israeli Apartheid after 2010. He is presently part of the Ontario Working Group on Criminal Law and HIV Exposure. For more than twenty years McCaskell worked at the Toronto Board of Education, developing and delivering programs on racism, homophobia and sexual harassment for students and teachers. He received the City of Toronto Award of Merit for his human rights work in 1996. His most recent book, Queer Progress: From Homophobia to Homonationalism, was published in 2016.

Wednesday, February 20th, 2019. 6:00-7:30pm
Doors open at 5:30pm and space is limited.

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Connect with us...

Queer Progress: an archival workshop with activist-historian Tim McCaskell on the Toronto of post-decriminalization, 1969-1974

Revisiting his own granular research that forms the backbone of the activist history Queer Progress: from Homophobia to Homonationalism, Toronto activist and education advocate Tim McCaskell will discuss queer politics in the period from the 1969 Omnibus to his first Gay Pride in 1974.

Heading west along Carlton St. Toronto Gay Pride March, August 1974.
Photo by Charles Dobie onthebookshelves.com
Police escort waiting for march to begin, Carlton St. Toronto Gay Pride March, August 1974.
Photo by Charles Dobie onthebookshelves.com

Participants will get an up- close look at the documents and mood of the period of early “gay liberation,” before the hegemony of Stonewall and the commercialism and police collaboration Topics discussed will include: how to look for community history in media and memory; the need for a broader social analysis to make sense of this history; queers and the police; and what the 1969 turning point did and did not accomplish for LGBTQ people in Toronto, and Canada at large.

The cover of Tim McCaskell’s book Queer Progress: From Homophobia to Homonationalism.

Tim McCaskell is a long-time Toronto writer, activist and educator. He was a collective member of The Body Politic, Canada’s first national magazine for Lesbian and Gay Liberation from 1974 to 1986, chair of the Public Action Committee of the Right to Privacy Committee which fought back against police raids on gay baths in Toronto in the early 1980s, and part of the Simon Nkodi Anti-Apartheid Committee: Lesbians and Gays Against Apartheid in the late 80s. He was a founding member of AIDS ACTION NOW!, an activist group which won access to experimental treatments and funding for medications in the 1990s and Queers Against Israeli Apartheid after 2010. He is presently part of the Ontario Working Group on Criminal Law and HIV Exposure. For more than twenty years McCaskell worked at the Toronto Board of Education, developing and delivering programs on racism, homophobia and sexual harassment for students and teachers. He received the City of Toronto Award of Merit for his human rights work in 1996. His most recent book, Queer Progress: From Homophobia to Homonationalism, was published in 2016.

Wednesday, February 20th, 2019. 6:00-7:30pm
Doors open at 5:30pm and space is limited.

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

News Categories

CONTACT US


Telephone: 416-777-2755
Email: queeries@arquives.ca

Street Address:
34 Isabella Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1N1

Mailing Address:
The ArQuives
P.O. Box 699
663A Yonge Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1Z9

PUBLIC HOURS

6:30 pm - 9:00 pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Friday

NOTE TO RESEARCHERS:

Some of our materials are stored off site. Before visiting the archives, please send us an email at queeries@arquives.ca listing in detail the topics and sources that you wish to consult and we will let you know when they will be available. We aim to respond to email inquiries within 4 business days.

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE:

As we continue our efforts to make The ArQuives more accessible, we are renovating the front of the house to add a ramp to the front entrance. Please note that there will not be any construction work done during public service hours. Should there be any disruptions affecting our access to the front door and/or work in the house during this process, we will post a notice as soon as possible. Thank you for your understanding and patience as we try to make The ArQuives more accessible to all. If you have any questions/concerns, please contact the Executive Director, Raegan Swanson, at executivedirector@arquives.ca


The ArQuives is located on the traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishnaabe and the Huron-Wendat. Today, Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

The ArQuives strives to gather the stories of the unheard and silenced voices of the 2SLGBTQ+ first peoples of this land. We acknowledge that some stories have already been lost, and we aim to ensure that those that remain and those that are to come are preserved for the future.