KEEPING OUR STORIES ALIVE

A Harlem Nocturne: an archival workshop with artist Deanna Bowen on the criminalization of Black nightlife in Vancouver

A Harlem Nocturne: an archival workshop with artist Deanna Bowen on the criminalization of Black nightlife in Vancouver

Deanna Bowen will share her research on the personal, political, and playful intersection of family legend, urban violence, and racial tensions unaddressed by the decriminalization and resulting paradigm shift of the Omnibus Criminal Law Amendment Act 1969. Deanna Bowen will discuss her research on the criminalization of Black nightclubs in a city known for its racist real estate, urban “renewal” activities, and frontier status in the struggle to undo the misery of the war on drugs. In this, Bowen’s work parallels that of queer historians tracking why and how and to whose benefit the crack-down on queer nightlife worsened and intensified in the very decade after sodomy and abortion were finally legalized in Canada. A song for Vancouver’s Black nightlife, and a story of brutally forgotten bodies.

A still from an interview with Deanna Bowen. Find the full interview here.

Deanna Bowen (b. 1969, Oakland; lives in Toronto) is a descendant of the Alabama and Kentucky born Black Prairie pioneers of Amber Valley and Campsie, Alberta. Bowen’s family history has been the central pivot of her auto-ethnographic interdisciplinary works since the early 1990s. Her broader artistic/educational practice examines history, historical writing and the ways in which artistic and technological advancements impact individual and collective authorship. She has received several awards in support of her artistic practice including a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship and the 2014 William H. Johnson Prize. Her work has been exhibited internationally in numerous film festivals and museums, including the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania, the Images Festival, Flux Projects, the Kassel Documentary Film and Video Festival, the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, and the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 6:00-7:30pm.
Doors open at 5:30pm and space is limited.

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Connect with us...

A Harlem Nocturne: an archival workshop with artist Deanna Bowen on the criminalization of Black nightlife in Vancouver

Deanna Bowen will share her research on the personal, political, and playful intersection of family legend, urban violence, and racial tensions unaddressed by the decriminalization and resulting paradigm shift of the Omnibus Criminal Law Amendment Act 1969. Deanna Bowen will discuss her research on the criminalization of Black nightclubs in a city known for its racist real estate, urban “renewal” activities, and frontier status in the struggle to undo the misery of the war on drugs. In this, Bowen’s work parallels that of queer historians tracking why and how and to whose benefit the crack-down on queer nightlife worsened and intensified in the very decade after sodomy and abortion were finally legalized in Canada. A song for Vancouver’s Black nightlife, and a story of brutally forgotten bodies.

A still from an interview with Deanna Bowen. Find the full interview here.

Deanna Bowen (b. 1969, Oakland; lives in Toronto) is a descendant of the Alabama and Kentucky born Black Prairie pioneers of Amber Valley and Campsie, Alberta. Bowen’s family history has been the central pivot of her auto-ethnographic interdisciplinary works since the early 1990s. Her broader artistic/educational practice examines history, historical writing and the ways in which artistic and technological advancements impact individual and collective authorship. She has received several awards in support of her artistic practice including a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship and the 2014 William H. Johnson Prize. Her work has been exhibited internationally in numerous film festivals and museums, including the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania, the Images Festival, Flux Projects, the Kassel Documentary Film and Video Festival, the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, and the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 6:00-7:30pm.
Doors open at 5:30pm and space is limited.

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

News Categories

CONTACT US


Telephone: 416-777-2755
Email: queeries@arquives.ca

Street Address:
34 Isabella Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1N1

Mailing Address:
The ArQuives
P.O. Box 699
663A Yonge Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1Z9

PUBLIC HOURS

6:30 pm - 9:00 pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Friday

NOTE TO RESEARCHERS:

Some of our materials are stored off site. Before visiting the archives, please send us an email at queeries@arquives.ca listing in detail the topics and sources that you wish to consult and we will let you know when they will be available. We aim to respond to email inquiries within 4 business days.

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE:

As we continue our efforts to make The ArQuives more accessible, we are renovating the front of the house to add a ramp to the front entrance. Please note that there will not be any construction work done during public service hours. Should there be any disruptions affecting our access to the front door and/or work in the house during this process, we will post a notice as soon as possible. Thank you for your understanding and patience as we try to make The ArQuives more accessible to all. If you have any questions/concerns, please contact the Executive Director, Raegan Swanson, at executivedirector@arquives.ca


The ArQuives is located on the lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, Haudenosaunee, the Anishnaabe and the Huron-Wendat. Today, Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

The ArQuives strives to gather the stories of the unheard and silenced voices of the 2SLGBTQ+ first peoples of this land. We acknowledge that some stories have already been lost, and we aim to ensure that those that remain and those that are to come are preserved for the future.