Pride Show: Gay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983

Pride Show: Gay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983

Pride Show: Gay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983

gay premises, exhibition posterGay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983 
Exhibit opening June 14, 2013 at the CLGA
Gay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983 looks at the ways in which The Body Politic (TBP), a Toronto-based gay newspaper (1971-1987), became a dominant voice in the body politics of the LGBTQ+ communities in Canada. On the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (CLGA), the exhibition has been envisioned as a way to think about the significance of the radical politics that shaped the archive’s origin and affects its future. In providing ways to engage with the political bodies that participated in the ‘gay’ liberation movement, the project seeks to broaden and complicate the record by retrieving traces of the diverse queer populations that were active across Canada. The premise of the exhibition is that a diversity of men and women participated in the Gay Liberation Front, Women’s lib, feminists, Socialists, activists and writers came together, argued, raised collective consciousness and chose separate paths. Their writing, photographs, songs and protest rallies were the many voices of collective action. Sometimes fierce, other times collaborative, these young people radicalized their peers and effected generational change.
The focus of the project is on the period from 1973 to 1983, which begins with the formation of the archives and ends with application of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (passed 1982). The documents and images are drawn largely from their complete holdings of TBP (established 1971) and the wide collection of radical press periodicals held by the CLGA. A gay premises, the archives was vulnerable to raids and repressive laws. Broadening the understanding of the topics discussed and the forms of consensus and decision making about what to print and when, the project reveals the fabric of the everyday in a visual and tactile fashion.
The curated display features original submissions, photographs, posters, cartoons and news items from activists who contributed to TBP and to other radical gay publications that formed the core of the early collection of the CLGA. TAG TEAM: Gay Premises, is a collaborative and intergenerational art project that invites artists to contribute, intervene, and question the critical exploration of Canada’s gay liberation history and the way that GLBTQ+ histories have been promoted and preserved in the archives.
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Pride Show: Gay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983

Pride Show: Gay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983

gay premises, exhibition posterGay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983 
Exhibit opening June 14, 2013 at the CLGA
Gay Premises: Radical Voices in the Archives, 1973-1983 looks at the ways in which The Body Politic (TBP), a Toronto-based gay newspaper (1971-1987), became a dominant voice in the body politics of the LGBTQ+ communities in Canada. On the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (CLGA), the exhibition has been envisioned as a way to think about the significance of the radical politics that shaped the archive’s origin and affects its future. In providing ways to engage with the political bodies that participated in the ‘gay’ liberation movement, the project seeks to broaden and complicate the record by retrieving traces of the diverse queer populations that were active across Canada. The premise of the exhibition is that a diversity of men and women participated in the Gay Liberation Front, Women’s lib, feminists, Socialists, activists and writers came together, argued, raised collective consciousness and chose separate paths. Their writing, photographs, songs and protest rallies were the many voices of collective action. Sometimes fierce, other times collaborative, these young people radicalized their peers and effected generational change.
The focus of the project is on the period from 1973 to 1983, which begins with the formation of the archives and ends with application of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (passed 1982). The documents and images are drawn largely from their complete holdings of TBP (established 1971) and the wide collection of radical press periodicals held by the CLGA. A gay premises, the archives was vulnerable to raids and repressive laws. Broadening the understanding of the topics discussed and the forms of consensus and decision making about what to print and when, the project reveals the fabric of the everyday in a visual and tactile fashion.
The curated display features original submissions, photographs, posters, cartoons and news items from activists who contributed to TBP and to other radical gay publications that formed the core of the early collection of the CLGA. TAG TEAM: Gay Premises, is a collaborative and intergenerational art project that invites artists to contribute, intervene, and question the critical exploration of Canada’s gay liberation history and the way that GLBTQ+ histories have been promoted and preserved in the archives.
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CONTACT US


Telephone: 416-777-2755
Email: queeries@clga.ca

Street Address:
34 Isabella Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1N1

Mailing Address:
Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives
P.O. Box 699
663A Yonge Street
Toronto, ON M4Y 1Z9

PUBLIC HOURS


6:30 pm - 9:00 pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Friday

NOTE TO RESEARCHERS:
Some of our materials are stored off site. Before visiting the archives, please send us an email at queeries@clga.ca listing in detail the topics and sources that you wish to consult and we will let you know when they will be available. We aim to respond to email inquiries within 4 business days.

The Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives is located on the traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishnaabe and the Huron-Wendat. Today, Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

The CLGA strives to gather the stories of the unheard and silenced voices of the 2SLGBTQ+ first peoples of this land. We acknowledge that some stories have already been lost, and we aim to ensure that those that remain and those that are to come are preserved for the future.

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